The Caribbean Spectrum Management Conference

Event Overview

New to the Global Spectrum Series for 2024, the inaugural Caribbean Spectrum Management Conference will take place on 14 – 15 May 2024 at the Half Moon Hotel in Montego Bay, Jamaica, alongside CTU’s Spectrum Management Taskforce Meeting on 16 May.

Registration is now available – you can register your place here.

Across 2 days attendees will have the opportunity to be involved in discussions on the key spectrum topics for the Caribbean region and beyond, through interactive sessions, networking opportunities, an exhibition area and much more.

This event is part of The Global Spectrum Series. The world’s largest collection of regional spectrum policy conferences. Click on the image on the left to find out more about the series.

  • Global Spectrum Series

    This event takes place as part of the Global Spectrum Series - the world’s largest collection of regional spectrum policy conferences.

Key Themes

Hover over the image to find out more…

  • WRC-23

    Outcomes and next steps
  • Caribbean Spectrum Management Policy Framework

  • Key mid-band frequencies

    C-band and 6GHz
  • Emerging roadmaps for the rollout of 5G

  • Analogue switch-off and future UHF band plans

  • Non terrestrial networks, Direct-to-device and ESIMs

  • Connecting the Unconnected

  • Spectrum award, pricing and licencing

  • Spectrum, disaster relief and emergency management

Event Background

The Caribbean Spectrum Management Conference is new to the Global Spectrum Series for 2024. Taking place in Jamaica as an in-person event, we’re looking forward to this addition to the series! Take a look at the highlights video from last year’s Global Spectrum Series to see what we have in store. 

 

Organisers & Partners

Organised by

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Hosted by

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In partnership with

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Platinum Partners

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Product Partners

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Audio Partners

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Knowledge Partners

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Gold Partners

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Exhibitor & Networking Partners

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Confirmed Speakers Include

The Honourable Daryl Vaz MP 240

The Honourable Daryl Vaz MP

Minister of Science, Energy, Telecommunications and Transport, Government of Jamaica

Maria Myers Hamilton 240

Maria Myers Hamilton

Managing Director
Spectrum Management Authority, Jamaica

Oscar Leon 240

Oscar Leon

Executive Secretary
Inter-American Telecommunication Commission (CITEL)

Nada Jones 240

Narda Jones

Chief of Staff
FCC

Richard Womersley 240

Richard Womersley

Spectrum Manager
Utility Regulation and Competition Office (OfReg), Caymen Islands

Sidney de Weever 240

Sidney de Weever

Head of Technical Division
Bureau Telecommunications and Post, St. Maarten

Tarcisio Aurelio Bakaus 240

Tarcísio Aurélio Bakaus

Coordinator - Spectrum, Orbit and Broadcasting Division
ANATEL Brazil

Keite Dyvrande 240

Keite Dyvrande

Radio Engineer
ANFR France

Carol Sosa Leguizamón 240

Carol Sosa Leguizamón

Spectrum Policy Director
GSMA

Natalia Vicente 240

Natalia Vicente

Vice President, Public Affairs
GSOA

Jose-Ayala-240

Jose Ayala

Director of Government and Industry Relations, Latin America
Ericsson

Ryan Johnson 240

Ryan Johnson

Senior Director, Global Market Access & Government Affairs Lead, Latin America
Viasat

Alex Epshteyn 240

Alex Epshteyn

Manager, International Regulatory Affairs and Spectrum Engineering
Amazon Kuiper

Hazem Moakkit 240

Hazem Moakkit

Vice President, Spectrum Strategy
Intelsat

Joe Ciaudelli 240

Joe Ciaudelli

Director, Spectrum & Innovation
Sennheiser

Cameron Currin 240

Cameron Currin

Manager
Aetha Consulting

Agenda

You can view the agenda in your preferred time zone by selecting it from the list below.
Day 1
2024-05-14
Day 2
2024-05-15
08:00 - 09:00
Breakfast Briefing

An introduction to some of the key themes and issues to covered in detail during the sessions.

09:15 - 10:00
Session 1: Welcome and Feature Addresses
10:00 - 10:45
Session 2: Ministerial & Policy Leader Round Table: Working Together to make Spectrum Work for the Caribbean
10:45 - 11:10
Morning Refreshment Break
11:10 - 12:25
Session 3: WRC-23 outcomes and next steps

Held at the end of last year, WRC-23 provided an opportunity for the global connectivity communities to come together to review (and where necessary, update) the Radio Regulations – the rules that govern the use of spectrum all around the world. Important decisions were taken on several agenda items related to IMT, satellite, WiFi, broadcast and other key users. This session will provide an opportunity to look back at these decisions and consider the implications for stakeholders across the Caribbean region. It will look at the next steps as resolutions begin to be implemented, and the key issues that will be addressed during the next four years as part of the next ‘cycle’ towards WRC-27. It will also explore how these issues will contribute to shaping the future connectivity landscape, both in the Caribbean region and globally.
 

  • What main decisions were taken at WRC-23, especially for Region 2 and how could they impact the spectrum ecosystem in Caribbean countries and the bandwidth that is going to be available to different industry groups and technologies?
  • In which areas is there now clarity in the decisions that have been reached, and where are there still potential questions remaining?
  • What were the key goals across Caribbean states going into WRC-23 and to what extent were these achieved?
  • To what extent did the Caribbean region have a common position in the WRC-23? Given the number of individual states in the Caribbean region, collaborating as a regional ‘block’ has the potential to provide significant influence at both a CITEL and ITU level. What obstacles are restricting this and how can stakeholders work together to harness the collective power that the region could have?
  • What are the key agenda items and bands that await a decision at the WRC-27 that will impact the Caribbean region?
  • What are the key agenda items, topics and bands to be discussed at WRC-27, and which of these should be the main priorities for the Caribbean region?
  • What are the first steps that are being taken in the build-up to this and what preparation needs to begin from Caribbean stakeholders and the broader CITEL region to start on the path towards a successful WRC cycle?
12:25 - 13:25
Lunch
13:25 - 14:30
Session 4: Towards a spectrum management policy framework for the Caribbean – The challenges and opportunities of closer collaboration and harmonisation

The Caribbean region shows a variety of nations, cultures, and landscapes, each with its unique set of priorities, challenges and opportunities when it comes to managing spectrum. At the same, a coordinated approach to spectrum planning and management policies across the region and increased sharing of best practices across countries and states could bring huge benefits in terms of reducing potential interference and delivering a more integrated and efficient market. Increasing coordination in this way is one of the objectives of the CTU Spectrum Management Taskforce, and as part of this, work is currently ongoing to update the current Caribbean Spectrum Management Policy Framework, which dates back to 2008. This session will look at the unique challenges and complexities of managing spectrum in the Caribbean, and specifically of coordinating spectrum policy and band plans across the region. It will explore in detail the current spectrum policy landscape in the region, identify challenges and opportunities, and it will discuss strategies for increasing harmonisation, coordination, and sharing of best practices to maximise the benefits of spectrum for the region.
 

  • How much coordination is currently seen when it comes to spectrum policy across the Caribbean region, and how consistent are allocation policies and band plans across its different countries?
  • What are the potential benefits of additional coordination and harmonisation both in terms of technical interoperability and economic efficiency?
  • What were the goals of the original Caribbean Spectrum Management Policy Framework and how successful was it in delivering on these? What lessons can be taken from this as work now begins to update this framework to bring it in line with the current connectivity environment?
  • How has the telecom landscape and the relationship between key spectrum users such as IMT, spectrum and broadcasters changed since the release of the first policy framework, and how can a new framework be adapted to take account of this?
  • Where is the balance between developing a coordinated regional approach for spectrum policy, providing flexibility and allowing countries to develop their specific national framework reflecting their particular needs and recognising the differences that exist between countries?
  • What different influences are seen in the region when it comes to spectrum policy from other geographical areas such as North America, Latin America and Europe, and how are these impacting harmonisation efforts in the Caribbean region?
  • What strategies are being considered to address the specific challenges posed by the fact that most countries are following the CITEL band plan, but then European overseas territories in the region often follow the CEPT plan?
  • How can the region work together to maximise its influence both in the Americas region and on the global stage? What role can CTU play in this?
  • How can regulators and telecommunications operators collaborate with neighbouring countries to mitigate interference issues and ensure efficient spectrum utilisation?
14:30 - 15:35
Session 5: Unlocking the potential of the UHF digital dividend bands – analogue switch-off and future band plan strategies

The path towards digital switchover has been ongoing for a number of years in the Caribbean region, with countries setting out plans for an ‘analogue switch-off’ as they transition to digital services for their citizens. However, several challenges have been stalling this process, and the digital transition has been a long and ongoing process, with countries in different stages of transition. This session will look at the current state of play across countries in the region when it comes to the digital switchover, and explore the urgency of getting this completed. It will look at the factors that have contributed to the continued delay in switchover and the challenges that still remain, as well as discussing the potential benefits that the ‘digital dividend’ spectrum that would be released could bring (particularly in the 600MHz and 700MHz bands). Finally, it will look more broadly at the wider UHF frequencies and at how regulators can ensure that the potential of spectrum in these frequencies is maximised and that the needs of key users in the band such as IMT, broadcast, PMSE and more can all be met.
 

  • What progress has been made in transitioning the UHF bands (i.e. 700 MHz) from analogue to digital services in the Caribbean, and what is the planned roadmap ahead?
  • What are the main factors that are still delaying this in countries that have not yet undertaken the switchover process and how can these be overcome?
  • What is the current status of terrestrial broadcasting across the region and how widely is it used? In countries where its use is very limited, does it make more sense to consider a terrestrial switch-off rather than a switch-over?
  • Should digital broadcasting be considered an urgency for the Caribbean? What benefits are there to be derived from transitioning to digital, in terms of spectrum efficiency, value and revenue, content distribution and development, particularly local content, and investment in infrastructure?
  • Where should the priorities lie for the region about the update of band plans in the 600-700 MHz bands, and to what extent is a co-ordinated approach being seen? how can the available spectrum be maximised for the benefit of all users?
  • How can regulators and industry stakeholders collaborate to maximise the potential of the UHF spectrum bands for supporting emerging technologies and services?
  • What are the future plans of the different users in the band (for example broadcasters, mobile, PMSE) and how can their requirements across the band be met in the medium to longer term?
  • How can it be ensured that the potential of spectrum in these frequencies is maximised for the benefit of all?
15:35 - 15:55
Afternoon Refreshment Break
15:55 - 17:00
Session 6: Harnessing the potential of satellite and non-terrestrial connectivity ecosystem for the benefit of the Caribbean region

The global space and satellite sector is evolving massively, with a large number of innovative new technologies and business models emerging. This rapid evolution brings with it a swathe of exciting new opportunities for the Caribbean region as well as the rest of the world, but also several regulatory challenges. This session aims to explore the opportunities, challenges, and regulatory considerations facing regulators in order to maximise the value of satellite connectivity across Caribbean countries. It will look at the different options that regulators have when making decisions on licencing NGSOs to provide broadband services and different approaches that are being taken; as well as discuss how best to meet the connectivity requirements of exciting new non-terrestrial use cases such as direct-to-device and HIBS. In addition, it will explore are the national regulatory frameworks related to ESIM and satellite connectivity spectrum allocation, licensing, and usage, including geostationary (GSO) and non-geostationary satellite services (NGSO).  What potential can non-terrestrial connectivity offer across Caribbean states and communities, and how best can spectrum policy be managed to maximise the available benefits?
 

  • What exciting innovations are being seen within the satellite sector, and what potential benefits could these offer for Caribbean states?
  • What are the challenges faced by service providers when it comes to spectrum licencing and authorisation regimes for satellite systems and how can it be ensured that a regulatory and licencing framework is provided that encourages new entrants and competition whilst also protecting the rights of incumbent users?
  • How does the geography of the Caribbean region also pose challenges for D2D rollout, and how can operators ensure that in serving one island, their signal is not interfering with services in sometimes closely located neighbouring states?
  • What licencing models and rules currently guide access to spectrum for satellite systems across the region and how are these having to evolve given the huge increase in low-orbit satellite constellations that is being seen?
  • How can regulators and policymakers support innovation and investment in satellite technology to meet evolving connectivity needs and at the same time provide affordable services for end users in the Caribbean?
  • How can regulators facilitate the integration of GSO and NGSO satellite systems to provide comprehensive coverage and high-quality satellite connectivity services throughout the region? Is a fair coexistence of GSO and NGSO satellites in the same band a possibility?
  • What specific benefits could satellite connectivity (including D2D and other hybrid networks such as HIBS and HAPS) offer Caribbean nations? How can Caribbean countries best position themselves to take advantage of hybrid network connectivity, considering their unique geographic and environmental particularities?
  • How are countries in the Caribbean region dealing with rules or policies that address spectrum allocation, licensing, and usage for ESIM-enabled devices and satellite connectivity (including GSO/NGSO services) in the region?
  • How can the connectivity requirements of these hybrid networks be met? What are the technical and regulatory challenges of using either MNO’s existing spectrum or spectrum that has been specifically allocated to Mobile Satellite Services?
17:00 - 19:30
Evening Networking Reception

Hosted by SMA Jamaica
Entertainment provided by Sennheiser

08:00 - 08:45
Breakfast Briefing

An introduction to some of the key themes and issues to covered in detail during the sessions.

Session 7: Maximising the value for all Caribbean stakeholders across key mid-band frequencies
09:00 - 10:05
Session 7i: What is the right balance across the C-band (3.3–3.8GHz)?

The 3.5GHz C-band, with its wide range of applications and services, holds immense potential for driving connectivity and innovation. Finding the delicate balance between meeting the needs of key broadcast and satellite services whilst at the same time meeting the growing demand for IMT services is key for all regulators. This session offers a platform for stakeholders to engage and discuss the different approaches in the band that are seen across the region, and the extent to which different countries are achieving this balance. It will explore the options that are available across the different parts of the 3.3–3.8GHz frequency range and look at how regulators and technology providers can work together to ensure maximum value is being obtained from this valuable spectrum, whilst ensuring equitable access and minimal interference for all users.
 

  • To what degree is the potential of the C–band being maximised across the Caribbean region, and are there still ways to use it more efficiently and effectively?
  • How can regulators make sure that the needs of key broadcast and satellite services in the band are balanced with the need to provide coverage for IMT?
  • How are regulators addressing potential interference in this band? What steps are needed to ensure that IMT is introduced in the band in a way that doesn’t interfere with satellite services in adjacent bands?
  • What is the situation in the region in the 3.7–3.8GHz portion of the band? Given that most Caribbean states are islands and have no borders, does this provide regulators with more flexibility with the best decision to make in that frequency?
  • Given the WRC-23 identification of bands for IMT in the 3.3–3.4GHz segment band for regions 1 and 2, to what extent can this portion of the band be seen as an option for IMT in the Caribbean countries?
  • What are the plans for current users of the band (i.e. FWA service providers)?
  • Which examples can be seen in the region of policies and rules that support the coordination of spectrum usage and managing interference issues in the region?
10:05 - 11:10
Session 7ii: Finding the right balance in the 6GHz band

The 6GHz band is seen by the WiFi and IMT sectors as a vital component of meeting their future connectivity requirements. During the WRC-23, decisions were taken regarding the use of the bands – or parts of it, however, some questions remain about the optimal approach to spectrum allocation and the potential benefits of a regional harmonised approach, in particular for the Caribbean. With the US/Canada deciding to make the entire band available on an unlicensed basis, but with much of the rest of the Americas leaving options open to possibly explore a licensed regime in the upper part of the band, this session aims to examine the current situation across the region (and globally) as well as the different approaches being adopted and to consider which could be the best approach for Caribbean states.
 

  • What is the current situation across the Caribbean and wider Americas when it comes to the 6GHz band?
  • To what extent are approaches in other countries and regions outside the Caribbean influencing decisions here? With large markets potentially looking to go down the route of a licenced, unlicenced and hybrid approach respectively, what should be the best approach for Caribbean states?
  • Is a regional harmonised approach in the band still a possibility for the Caribbean and what benefits could this potentially bring?
  • What would be the respective pros and cons of making the spectrum in the upper 6GHz portion of the band available on a licenced and unlicensed basis?
  • How quickly can it be expected that spectrum in the 6GHz band could be made available and what impact can this have on the implementation of different services (licensed or unlicensed) in Caribbean countries?
  • To what extent should countries be considering their decision about the use of the 6GHz band based on taking advantage of the economies of scale at a wider regional or global level?
  • How could the integration of both WiFi and IMT services into the band best be facilitated and could a ‘win-win’ approach still be delivered?

 

11:10 - 11:30
Morning Refreshment Break
11:30 - 13:00
Session 8: Where next? Emerging roadmaps for the rollout of 5G and future connectivity technologies across the region

The discussion on 5G or even 6G adoption is a trending topic at a global level, however, within the Caribbean region stakeholders are still assessing readiness for its deployment. 4G deployment across the region is still patchy, even in urban areas therefore creating a viable business case for 5G is a challenge, it seems that Caribbean countries have their hands full in maximising the already installed technologies. In this context, this session will look at the 5G pioneer bands in the region and assess how Caribbean countries might still be able to position themselves to capitalise on 5G.
 

  • What is the business case for 5G over 4G (both for mobile operators and private networks)? What could be the benefit to Caribbean countries of 5G?
  • What are the main challenges when it comes to the rollout of 5G in the Caribbean region and what options are available to overcome these?
  • How can Caribbean operators balance the need to strengthen 4G networks whilst also starting to explore 5G deployment?
  • How do cost considerations impact network rollout efforts, and what tools are available to regulators and operators to reduce deployment costs?
  • To what extent can regulators and policymakers promote and contribute to incentivise the interest of operators to invest in 5G networks?
  • What different funding models are being explored to facilitate the rollout of 5G services? To what extent is it fair to ask larger content and application providers to pay a network usage fee to help bear some of the cost of 5G infrastructure deployment and rollout?
  • What spectrum bands are considered pioneer 5G bands in the Caribbean region and which portion of this spectrum has been assigned?
  • What role can the reframing of legacy 2G and 3G spectrum play in delivery the required spectrum, and how could this best be managed?
  • What coordination is being seen in the region when it comes to the development of 5G rollout strategies? How can stakeholders work together to develop and accelerate 5G deployment?
  • What impact could the large amount of fibre rollout that is seen across much of the region have on 5G rollout speed and strategies?
  • What lessons can be learnt from 5G plans in other countries in the region, in the Americas or globally?
Country Case Study – Dominican Republic
Country Case Study – Jamaica
Country Case Study – Bermuda
The view from industry
Interactive discussion with session speakers
13:00 - 13:55
Lunch
13:55 - 15:00
Session 9: Tackling the digital divide – how can spectrum policy help to tackle technical, geographical and financial challenges related to connecting unconnected communities?

Despite efforts from governments in the Caribbean to promote infrastructure investment, network roll-out and increase in connectivity, many communities remain unconnected due to technical, geographical, and financial challenges. This session aims to explore how spectrum policy can play a crucial role in bridging this gap, ensuring that most localities have access to the benefits of the digital age. It will provide the stage for a discussion around what needs to be done to connect the unconnected across the region, considering financial as well as technical /geographical challenges; and discuss how regulators can work alongside different connectivity providers to meet the connectivity requirements of unserved areas cost-effectively and efficiently.
 

  • What role are different connectivity technologies already playing a part in connecting the region, and what technology mix will be needed to connect regions still unconnected?
  • How can it be ensured that the connectivity requirements of communities are understood and that the required solutions to deliver this are rolled out as quickly as possible?
  • What different approaches can be used to deliver connectivity to unconnected communities cost-effectively?
  • How can regulators collaborate with industry stakeholders and local communities to address the unique challenges of expanding connectivity?
  • What technological advances have been seen across crucial technologies such as fixed wireless access (FWA), advanced satellite broadband and WiFi? What potential do these have to be part of the solution?
  • How can spectrum policy help to facilitate faster rollout of networks and ensure that underserved communities and homes are brought online as soon as possible?
  • Can spectrum policy make a difference, or are there too many other external factors and challenges?
  • What measures are being taken to ensure that internet services remain affordable for low-income households and marginalised communities in the Caribbean?
15:00 - 15:20
Afternoon Refreshment Break
15:20 - 16:00
Session 10: Spectrum award, pricing and licencing masterclass

This session will draw on approaches from countries within the Caribbean and beyond to focus on best practices in spectrum award, pricing and licencing. Experts will discuss the specific circumstances in Caribbean states, the challenges and opportunities that this brings, and how this impacts spectrum award and pricing strategies in the region. It will look at what the key objectives should be when it comes to selecting the best way forward and what regulators and countries can do to ensure that they are achieved.
 

  • What are the pros and cons of the different award methods available to regulators looking to allocate spectrum in the region (auctions, beauty contests / cashless auctions, first-come-first-served etc.), and in which situations are each most appropriate?
  • What best practices have been observed in licensing and awards throughout the region, and how can regulators ensure that their selection of award method balances both economic and social value?
  • What specific challenges exist when allocating and licencing spectrum in small island states such as those seen across the Caribbean, and how to do these impact spectrum assignment and pricing strategies?
  • To what extent is the definition of spectrum regulatory fees a challenge for regulators? How do these factors influence long-term investment in the region and ultimately, foster the provision of affordable services and minimise cost barriers to entry?
  • To what extent are spectrum prices a hindrance to network rollout across the region?
  • If prices are set administratively, what methodologies can be used to ensure fees reflect the market value of the spectrum?
  • Where does the balance lie between the need for revenue generation, the aim of increasing competition and the desire to foster innovation while awarding spectrum?
  • To what degree is a reform of existing policies and procedures in licensing, allocation, assignment and pricing of spectrum needed to reflect the evolution of technologies?
16:00 - 16:45
Session 11: The role of spectrum in the resilience of networks, disaster relief and emergency management

In Caribbean nations, telecommunications infrastructure faces significant vulnerabilities due to natural disasters. Telecommunications services, including satellite services and hybrid networks, play a crucial role in disaster management by facilitating communication, coordination, and intelligence gathering during emergencies. This session will look at current approaches and bands that are used across the region for PPDR (public protection and disaster relief) networks, and the work that is being done on coordinating across states and fostering closer collaboration. and coordination between telecommunications service providers and national disaster management offices. It will look at the potential role that different technologies (including non-terrestrial services and hybrid networks involving both satellite and HIBS) could help to strengthen network resilience in emergency and disaster relief situations, and more broadly, at how spectrum policy alongside both new and existing technologies can all be brought together to deliver the best possible PPDR communication network and ensure effective disaster response and recovery.
 

  • How can national and regional spectrum policy support the resilience and reliability of public safety and emergency communications networks in the Caribbean?
  • What spectrum bands are currently being used to provide PPDR networks across the region? What work is being done to harmonise the range of frequencies that are used across the region for PPDR services and ensure that legacy systems in the very low-frequency ranges are updated with wideband or broadband communications? What progress has been made?
  • What spectrum allocation priorities should be established to ensure that critical services have access to the spectrum they need during emergencies and disasters?
  • How can regulators strike a balance between ensuring preparedness for emergencies and facilitating innovation and commercial deployment of innovative services in the region?
  • What can be done to increase interoperability now and in the future?
  • To what degree is the harmonisation of spectrum bands used by emergency response systems still needed in the region?
  • What measures can be taken to strengthen the resilience of satellite infrastructure and ensure the continuity of satellite-based communication services in the face of extreme weather events and other emergencies?
  • To what extent could direct-to-device (D2D) services help to tackle connectivity issues during emergencies? What examples of these benefits are being seen in the region or internationally?
  • What role can HIBS and HAPS play? Should regulators be considering granting licences in advance to be prepared for emergencies / hurricanes?
Select date to see events.

Event Information

Half Moon Hotel

Rose Hall St James Jamaica WI

Montego Bay

Jamaica

Where is the conference being held?
The conference is being held at the Half Moon Hotel in Montego Bay, Jamaica.
There is no registration fee for this event. Registration is now open, you can sign up to attend conference here.
A link to access the discounted rate will be sent to all delegates, after they have registered to attend the conference.
Yes. We are working closely with our partners in Jamaica to organise a number of cultural excursions that will take place on Monday 13th May. You can register your interest to participate in these on the registration portal.
You can find more information on the Global Spectrum Series here.

Last Year's Speakers Included

The Honourable Daryl Vaz MP 240

The Honourable Daryl Vaz MP

Minister of Science, Energy, Telecommunications and Transport, Government of Jamaica

Maria Myers Hamilton 240

Maria Myers Hamilton

Managing Director
Spectrum Management Authority, Jamaica

Oscar Leon 240

Oscar Leon

Executive Secretary
Inter-American Telecommunication Commission (CITEL)

Nada Jones 240

Narda Jones

Chief of Staff
FCC

Richard Womersley 240

Richard Womersley

Spectrum Manager
Utility Regulation and Competition Office (OfReg), Caymen Islands

Sidney de Weever 240

Sidney de Weever

Head of Technical Division
Bureau Telecommunications and Post, St. Maarten

Tarcisio Aurelio Bakaus 240

Tarcísio Aurélio Bakaus

Coordinator - Spectrum, Orbit and Broadcasting Division
ANATEL Brazil

Keite Dyvrande 240

Keite Dyvrande

Radio Engineer
ANFR France

Carol Sosa Leguizamón 240

Carol Sosa Leguizamón

Spectrum Policy Director
GSMA

Natalia Vicente 240

Natalia Vicente

Vice President, Public Affairs
GSOA

Jose-Ayala-240

Jose Ayala

Director of Government and Industry Relations, Latin America
Ericsson

Ryan Johnson 240

Ryan Johnson

Senior Director, Global Market Access & Government Affairs Lead, Latin America
Viasat

Alex Epshteyn 240

Alex Epshteyn

Manager, International Regulatory Affairs and Spectrum Engineering
Amazon Kuiper

Hazem Moakkit 240

Hazem Moakkit

Vice President, Spectrum Strategy
Intelsat

Joe Ciaudelli 240

Joe Ciaudelli

Director, Spectrum & Innovation
Sennheiser

Cameron Currin 240

Cameron Currin

Manager
Aetha Consulting

Contact

For more information on any aspect of this event, please contact us using any of the following details:

caribbeanspectrum@forum-global.com

Tel: +44 (0) 2920 783 020

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Registration

Please kindly note that this event will take place as an in-person only event. There will be no virtual element to this event, so please only register if you are able to physically participate in Jamaica.